THE WALKING DEAD SEASON 3: Q&A With The Cast & Producers

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Howdy  walker lovers..

Im here with some cool stuff in regards to the upcoming third season for AMC’s The Walking Dead (Boo! Dish Network Boo!)

As we get closer to the premiere i will be posting some interviews, pics and other fun stuff for all of you so stay tuned!

In the meantime check the following Q & A:

The Walking Dead - Season 3, Episode 1 - Photo Credit: Gene Page/AMC

 

Question: TELL US YOUR THOUGHTS ABOUT SEASON THREE OF “THE WALKING DEAD”?

Glen Mazzara, executive producer, writer, showrunner

“Season three is going to be the most thrilling action-packed season of TV, period. The show is

right on the edge. Stakes are very, very high. There will be surprising twists and turns in every

episode, and at the same time the show will continue to feel real and grounded. All these horrible

things are being thrown at our characters at such a relentless pace that the audience won’t be able

to catch their breath and figure out what’s going on. So I think it’s just the idea that you are

immersed in this apocalypse and there really is no escape.”

Andrew Lincoln (Rick Grimes)

“In season three we hit the ground running. The pace, the intensity, the energy of the opening episode sets the tone. We keep getting scripts and we ask how are they going to top this one and they keep doing it. I think they’ve done a fantastic job in the writers room of balancing all of those aspects of what I love about the show – that it can be emotional, character driven, thrilling, action- packed and terrifying at the same time.”

Sarah Wayne Callies (Lori Grimes)

“Season three is the cost of survival. A lot of decisions need to be made about who gets to survive and why. And who gets to decide and why. Among the living, our resources are dwindling – our food resources, our emotional resources, our spiritual resources, our physical resources – we’re running out of everything.”

Laurie Holden (Andrea)

“We jumped off a diving board from the finale of season two and plunged into more madness, more chaos, more grief, more excitement, more violence, more heartache.”

 

Steven Yeun (Glenn)

“There’s this level we’re hitting that I don’t think has been done on television before. In other shows you’re asked to be emotional because your car got impounded, and you’re grades didn’t turnout the way you wanted them to, and you didn’t make the football team so you cry in your room. But ours is ⎯ somebody you love has been ripped in half or someone you thought was your best friend has turned on you and cut you in the stomach. It’s insane. We’re operating at a level 10. I can only say, it’s going to be really intense and I don’t know if people will be able to keep their eyes off. They are going to be glued.”

Norman Reedus (Daryl)

“Season three is people vs. people.”

Danai Gurira (Michonne)

“The apocalyptic war zone comes to life.”

Gale Anne Hurd, executive producer

“The intensity level is incredible. The new cast realizes just what they are in for and the level we expect done. And they’ve become just as passionate about ‘The Walking Dead’ as the rest of us already are.”

David Alpert, executive producer

“We picked up the pace in season two; we’re putting our foot on the accelerator now.”

Greg Nicotero, co-executive producer, special effects make-up supervisor, designer

“We really want to sell that [the walkers] are decomposing and emaciated and hungry, and there are a lot of them. Where we see more and more walkers from last season with the farm getting over run, we are definitely maintaining that. I can only say that the show continues to make that upward trajectory with every episode.”

Q: WHERE DO WE PICK UP FROM SEASON TWO?

Glen Mazzara, executive producer, writer, showrunner

“Even though we are expanding our scope and introducing new characters, this is still very much the story of this small group that left Atlanta and is looking for a safe place. This is still very much the story of Rick trying to keep his family and his new adopted family safe and he’s finding that that’s nearly impossible to do.”

 

Sarah Wayne Callies (Lori Grimes)

“We ended season two in a blaze of something that was not glory, but it burned. The farm was overrun. Rick killed Shane. Carl killed Shane the walker. We got everybody that we possibly could and then ran. When we finally stopped for breath, Rick decided to change the rules. He decided the way to get through this was the way Shane had been suggesting along, which is we have one man with one vision and we follow him or we leave. Where we pick up is finding out that worked out pretty well. We haven’t lost anybody. They’re stronger. They’re cohesive. And they’re family.”

Lauren Cohan (Maggie)

“They are a weary group of people who really just need a break. Every time they think they’re safe, a hoard arrives and they have to go on the run again. God only knows what we’re eating… season three is pretty scary for us. You have to summon the courage and strength from nowhere to storm your way into it, especially when we arrive at the prison.”

Denise Huth, co-executive producer

“They’ve been on the road encountering all new sorts of threats, much bigger and scarier than you’ve ever seen before.”

Q: DOES THE SERIES DIFFER FROM, OR STAY THE SAME AS, THE COMIC BOOK?

Robert Kirkman, executive producer and writer

“One of the coolest things about this show in comparison to the comic this season is the fact that we didn’t have Andrea separate from the group and meet Michonne first in the comic book. The fact that those two characters are meeting and getting to interact and that leads to their discovery of Woodbury is a really cool alteration. We’re meeting Woodbury in a very different way.”

Glen Mazzara, executive producer, writer, showrunner

“It’ s about staying true to the spirit of the comic book. It’ s about staying raw , visceral. W e want to have these new characters and develop them and have them fully realized. And have people invested and when you see incredible stuff happen to them, it’s scary and it hurts.”

Denise Huth, co-executive producer

“Fans of the comic book are going to be really thrilled with season three – we’re getting into the prison, getting to meet the Governor, a lot of the big juicy stuff that happens in the books that they’re excited about; and fans of the show who don’t read the books, it just expands, the whole world is expanding.”

Q: WHAT CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT THE PRISON AND WOODBURY?

Glen Mazzara, executive producer, writer, showrunner

“As we work and develop all the other characters, it’s interesting how those settings are also characters that need their own arcs. I think Woodbury feels safe because it feels like the world before the apocalypse. It feels recognizable. It feels like life is going on in this corner. However, that’s certainly not the case because there are zombies at the gate.”

 

Robert Kirkman, executive producer and writer

“Introducing those characters and those new environments, the prison and Woodbury, are going to radically change the kind of stories that we tell and are really going to throw some interesting conflicts in the mix with some of the characters we already know and love.”

“There is going to be a really cool storyline surrounding this seemingly horrible place. No one wants to go to prison, but in the world of ‘The Walking Dead’ it’s the ideal place to survive. And that is weird. So that tells you a lot about the world that they’re living in and that is something that they’re going to be dealing with a lot in the third season.”

“We were able to bring in Grace Walker, who is a fantastic production designer, to construct our prison and to make this amazing, beyond-belief prison. They’ve taken a lot of what you’ve seen in the comic book series and brought it to life in ways that I didn’t think possible. Comic book fans are going to be absolutely thrilled when they see this stuff. This is going to be one of the most impressive looking things that’s ever been put together for a show that I’ve seen. I think television fans are going to be absolutely blown away.”

Gale Anne Hurd, executive producer

“We have the conflict and jeopardy emanating from so many different sources and obviously we can intercut stories that are taking place in Woodbury with stories that are taking place in the prison. That’s not something we had an opportunity to do last season when our group was all together in one location, being the farm.”

“With Woodbury, we’re setting up this first community that is functioning in a post-zombie apocalypse. We get to see not only the advantages of putting civilization back on its feet again, but also the dark forces at work in what may seem like a utopia.”

“I think it’s interesting that we hired a production designer with the last name ‘Walker’!”

Q: TELL US ABOUT SOME OF THE MAIN CHARACTERS THIS SEASON AND HOW THEY’VE EVOL VED.

Robert Kirkman, executive producer and writer

“We’re going to see an interesting evolution over the course of season three for Rick. He’s established the ‘Ricktadorship, ’ which people love saying. He’ s taken charge. He’ s being a little bit harsher towards the people around him. He’s not excepting their input on his leadership tactics. He’s really just doing whatever he has to do to keep these people alive. Moving from that, we’re going to see a guy who is to a certain extent, pushing people away. He’s going to learn a lot of things over the season and start seeing that might not be the best course of action.”

Andrew Lincoln (Rick Grimes)

“Rick has isolated himself from the group and in his marriage and that’s the way he is protecting everybody. I think it’s an interesting place to start this season. This season is about him realizing he needs other people to survive. I was fascinated when I got the role [Season One] to see his breaking point, and I think you see it this season.”

Sarah Wayne Callies (Lori Grimes)

“Rick wants to find the Holy Grail… Lori’s hope for that is not only that they will find it and have a safe place to plant crops and educate kids and all that, but once Rick has fulfilled that mission, he’ll be able to look at her again. Lori feels that Rick finding a safe haven is a contingency for their marriage healing.”

Chandler Riggs (Carl)

“Carl knows how to carry on. He looks more to the present than the past. He wants to become more of an adult.”

Laurie Holden (Andrea)

“It’s a very different season for Andrea because she’s separated from the group. She’s met this alpha female [Michonne] and they become very good friends. They watch each other’s backs. In previous seasons, Andrea’s been very reactionary. She’s going to be her own individual entity figuring out who she is in this world and making choices. She’s very active and independent. More than ever before.”

Steven Yeun (Glenn)

“I get an identifiable arch as someone who starts off as a boy and grows up into a man. The first season was showing he had that in him. The second season was realizing that for himself that he had that in him. And the third season is just manning–up and doing what he’s supposed to be doing. ”

Lauren Cohan (Maggie)

“Maggie is pretty lucky because she has more family with her left than anyone else does. The priority for her is protecting her own. We are now thrown into an absolutely insane world. The farm was a walk in the park compared to where we are now.”

Norman Reedus (Daryl)

“Daryl is a guy who’s been under the thumb of his big brother Merle and you could imagine what that could be like. Being away from Merle he’s finding being himself needed and appreciated. He’s making bonds with these people and will fight to the death for this group of people. He’s finding his way and growing up.”

IronE Singleton (T-Dog)

“You will get to see more of T-Dog this season. T-Dog and Rick are on the same page. They understand each other’s position. There’s a lot more we have in common than we don’t within this group. ”

Melissa McBride (Carol)

“The biggest difference in season three for Carol is instead of allowing the challenges of this world to paralyze her, she’s discovering herself. Her world has died away and she’s making a fresh start in a rotten world.”

Q: WHAT CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT THE GOVERNOR?

Robert Kirkman, executive producer and writer

“The Governor really is the pinnacle villain of the comic series thus far. Seeing David Morrissey’s take on the character and how he’s portraying him is awesome. To get an actor who isn’t really worried about his character being a good guy or likable, is willing to peel back the surface and get into the root of who this guy is, and why he’s doing all the horrible things he’s doing is really cool. I think the television audience is going to love the Governor as much as the comic book audience has. ”

“Humans do not follow any rules and will always do something that surprises you and are capable of doing things far worse than trying to eat you. And so it’s always been the plan to bring that to the forefront and tell more stories about just how threatening some of the humans are that they encounter. The Governor is going to be the embodiment of that in the third season and we’re definitely going to be seeing a lot of horrible things that this guy is going to do. So be on the lookout for that.”

Glen Mazzara, executive producer, writer, showrunner

“He’s a lot more developed and well-rounded. I think David Morrissey is doing a phenomenal job finding the humanity in that character and by having that humanity so prevalent when he commits atrocious acts, I think they’ll be that much more horrifying.”

David Morrissey (The Governor)

“I came into the show as a fan of the series. I don’t think we know who we are until we are challenged, and ‘The Walking Dead’ is a very challenging world. We’d like to think of the best aspects of ourselves, but we really don’t know until we are put into the fight. What you want for yourself and what you hope for yourself are not necessarily the case when you get into the pit.”

“Woodbury is an oasis in this madness. And his desire is to keep it that way.”

Q: WHAT SHOULD VIEWERS EXPECT FROM MICHONNE?

Danai Gurira (Michonne)

“Michonne is beyond a survivor, she’s a thriver. She’s transformed and recreated herself to respond to the world she’s in. She wants to be on top of the situation. She wants to be 10 paces ahead of it. That comes out of a wounded-ness, when you’ve come through trauma. There are many different responses to trauma. The question is how does it manifest? How it manifests in her is the decision to become a warrior.”

“I hadn’t watched [the series] before. I thought it would be too scary, but I knew it was renowned. It wasn’t scary. It’s about the human condition.”

“She doesn’ t learn [sword fighting] from anybody . It’ s just a survival thing. Y ou scour around for what you can survive with and that’s what she came across. She figured out how to make it work for herself. It’s extremely intense in the beginning and I did not know those muscles existed. I work out, but this is a whole other thing. It’s a lot of work. It’s very enjoyable and exhilarating, but very intense. ”

Robert Kirkman, executive producer and writer

“Michonne is translated on to screen pretty faithfully. Danai is doing a phenomenal job as the character. We haven’t toned her down for television. She’s still very brutal, very violent, but really capable. That’s the coolest thing about her. Having that character alive and running around on set is pretty remarkably strange for me. She’s one of my favorite characters from the comic.”

“Getting an actress of that caliber to come in and do this character is really a blessing. She’s going to do all of the hard character stuff and drama that ‘The Walking Dead’ is known for, but she has tremendous physical capability and the sword training that I’ve seen is absolutely amazing. I can’t wait to see her hack up some zombies.”

Q: WHAT CAN WE LOOK FORWARD TO WITH THE WALKERS THIS SEASON?

Greg Nicotero, co-executive producer, special effects make-up supervisor, designer

“What would happen to these creatures that don’t have the actual ability to protect themselves from the elements? You can only imagine how horrible the smell would be if you came into close proximity to these things that have literally been baking in the sun all day every day for a year. So we built some animatronic puppets that we will intersperse throughout the series that you may not recognize it, but after the fact you’ll be like ‘wow, how did they do that?’”

“One thing that I wanted to allow for in season three was rotted chests and rotted backs. We sculpted male and female rotted torsos that get glued directly to the performers. It was pretty fascinating to be able to look at that and take the zombie prosthetics to another level. One of the ideas we like playing up was that the walkers, because they are rotting and decomposed, is they’re sort of putrefying. If you come in contact with any of them and you slash at them, parts of them might sort of liquefy and come off. It’s pretty crazy.”

“We’re keeping the audience guessing. Every time you think you know how we did something, we’re going to throw something else at you.”

Gale Anne Hurd, executive producer

“Obviously we have the absolute best makeup effects team on the planet, led by Greg Nicotero, who is not only a co-executive producer and heads up our onset makeup, he also directs and directs second unit. Every year he ups his game. The performers that portray the zombies get better and better. They’ve had three years of zombie college and they’re about to go to graduate school. ”

Glen Mazzara, executive producer, writer, showrunner

“I’ll call Greg and ask ‘has this ever been done in a zombie movie?’ When he says no, we’re going with it! It’s a lot of fun to write.”

Q: SEASON ONE HAD SIX EPISODES. SEASON TWO HAD 13 EPISODES. SEASON THREE HAS 16 EPISODES. WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT THAT?

Robert Kirkman, executive producer and writer

“I think the more the better. I know a lot of work has gone into making this a really cool, all- encompassing story and getting to do 16 episodes as opposed to 13 is kind of awesome.”

Gale Anne Hurd, executive producer

“You have the opportunity to tell a larger-scale story. You can develop it with each of our large cast of characters, and of course we have some notable additions this season. It’s more difficult because we start shooting in early May, a month earlier, and we wrap up right before Thanksgiving. The challenge is the same insensitivity level of story-telling that our audience expects of us, and we certainly plan to deliver on that.”

Q: WHY DO YOU THINK AUDIENCES ARE SO PASSIONATE ABOUT THIS SERIES?

Glen Mazzara, executive producer, writer, showrunner

“The number one rule is not so much keeping the zombies scary, it’s keeping the show scary.”

Gale Anne Hurd, executive producer

“They’re not going to make it seem silly or far-fetched even though it is a far-fetched premise. The entire direction of the show stems from how the characters are responding to these situations as opposed to letting the plot getting ahead of the characters.”

Robert Kirkman, executive producer and writer

“This show has a lot of heart and a lot of warmth to it. It is a zombie show and it is extremely violent and horrifying at times, but there’s just so much humanity in it. Watching characters survive and go through these extreme situations is something people can relate to. But at the end of the day it’s about families coming together and helping neighbors. It’s a subtle optimistic show, aside from the fact that people are eating people every now and then.”

Norman Reedus (Daryl)

“We love each other, and our jobs, and our fans rock!”

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Well that’s it for right now fellas, stay tuned for more!

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