Review: Todd, The Ugliest Kid On Earth #7

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Review of: Todd, the Ugliest Kid on Earth #7
Product by:
Ken Kristensen
Version:
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Price:
$2.99

Todd, the Ugliest Kid on Earth #7


Reviewed by:
Rating:
4.5
On November 21, 2013
Last modified:November 21, 2013

Summary:

Kristensen and Perker are sick and twisted men who need help, but don’t get them any until they finish Todd.

Charlie Rose’s insidious brainwashing scheme turns Gus and the town into mindless PBS-starved zombies, with Todd and Marxman-the-demon-hunter helpless to stop him. And when the world’s most dangerous cosmetologist fails to improve Peggy’s looks, there’s nowhere to go but down. Meanwhile, Satan’s son, Craig, has a breakthrough during family counseling.

Todd’s battle against Charlie Rose and Satan himself continues this week in the pages of Todd, The Ugliest Kid On Earth. The seventh issue is written by Ken Kristensen with art by M.K. Perker. Sedat Gosterikli. Patrick Brosseau rounds out the cast with lettering. Todd’s new adventure has been an inappropriately hilarious thrill ride so far. Does Kristensen and company keep it up?

Todd weaves together several stories featuring the various characters throughout the narrative, but the main thrust sees Todd and the Marxman using the Hellhole that is Charlie Rose’s dark magically imbued table to travel to Hell to take on Satan. The Marxman has a score to settle with the prince of darkness and Todd needs to get his ‘sister’ back. It doesn’t help that the devil is a witless amateur stand-up who uses his angst ridden fat twelve year old son’s size as his material. Todd and The Marxman set out to find the horned villain and try to set things right. A quick Jet Ski ride down the river Styx and they should be there in no time. This is Todd, The Ugliest Kid on Earth, so what’s going to go wrong next?

Kristensen writes another deranged and hilarious issue. The off kilter humor hits harder and takes a deeper bite each and every month. The story pulls you in from page one and makes you care about what happens to Todd. His parents have reverted back into their moronic state of being, but you still want to see the little guy and even his ‘sister’ pull through. The Marxman is one of the greatest new characters in comicdom and I will start petitioning Kristensen for a spin-off or one-shot at the absolute least.  Perker is one of the most consistently brilliant artists out there. He has a skill for pulling off dark and macabre things with a sense of whimsy. He perfectly balances the story’s gags with the more detailed character work and dramatic moments of the issue. Gosterikli’s colors are bright and vibrant, and the deep reds when Todd and the Marxman make their trip is particularly striking.

Bottom Line: Kristensen and Perker are sick and twisted men who need help, but don’t get them any until they finish Todd. Month in and month out the line between humor and decency is obliterated. Todd continues to be a deep but hilarious story full of messed up characters you can’t help but love. 4.5/5

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