Review: Planetoid #3

by

Having made a stand against the cyborg militia, Silas must now lead the tribes in building a settlement.

Ken Garing’s Planetoid #3 continues the story of Silas as he tries to escape the planetoid that his spaceship crash landed onto. The third issue in the series has Silas taking a bit of a backseat as we see the bands of various tribes and species trying to come together to form a functioning community.

In issues 3, we continue on with Silas’ attempt at escape. He is trying to fix the ship that he found in the previous issue. As he trains the new villagers in how to use tools, we see some world building by Garing. We see these various tribes of people and frogmen that have been on the planetoid for as long as they’ve lived trying to mesh together. The previous issues have been more focused on our main character, but this one expands on the secondary characters and adds a lot of depth to the story. Garing uses a time lapse montage to show how the people come together and learn how to do certain things to make the community thrive. The main struggle in this issue is trying to find enough food for everybody. It is accomplished in an unusual way, but it doesn’t stand out as odd or take away from the story. Towards the halfway point you begin to see that the new community isn’t so safe after all. One of the dissenters of the new formation makes for the cliffhanger that leads us into what comes next. It works to show that the Ono Mao are still around and are a serious threat.

Bottom Line: Garing uses more dialogue than previous issues, but there are still those beautifully drawn silent moments that elevate the book. One full page is something as simple as a kite flying in the air, but it serves the story and looks beautiful. Garing continues to please with Planetoid. I give this issue a 4/5.

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