Review: Miss Fury #5

by
Review of: Miss Fury #5
Product by:
Rob Williams
Version:
Dynamite
Price:
$3.99

Miss Fury #5


Reviewed by:
Rating:
3.5
On August 28, 2013
Last modified:August 28, 2013

Summary:

Williams started out with a slightly confusing, but entertaining story hopping back and forth through time and closes it out by flipping over all of his cards and explaining how things played out.

In a future New York that’s been turned into a war zone by a flying V the size of Manhattan, the truth is finally revealed to Miss Fury. Has her time travelling been real or is she insane back in 1943? And who, exactly, has been manipulating her throughout? With only a dead Nazi scientist as her guide, it’s time for Marla Drake to decide what she is willing to fight and die for.

The first arc of the updated Miss Fury comes to a close this week. Miss Fury #5 is written by Rob Williams with art by Jack Herbert. Ivan Nunes provides colors with Simon Bowland handling letters. There have been a lot of twists and turns in this time hopping story, but does Williams tie up all the loose ends and answer all the questions?

In this issue we see Miss Fury having a conversation with Schauburger, the time traveling Nazi that was killed in the first issue. The two are having an extended conversation where the curtain is pulled back and Miss Fury starts to be told or pieces together everything that has happened to her since that night on the rooftop. She learns about the time travel device the Nazis had been working on and how it relates to her. Having figured out the secret to the night at the museum, she starts to travel backward and forward in time tying up loose ends and setting things right. But the question remains, who has been manipulating her the entire time? Can she set everything right and have a happy ending herself?

Williams writes a great issue. It is largely exposition and a conversation between two characters, but it feels tense and action-packed. I found myself flipping through page after page on the edge of my seat waiting to see what happens next. He takes a conversation full of answers and explanations and makes it feel like an issue long action sequence. We see a lot of scenes that made no sense in the previous four issues being put in context and tying up the story. There is still one big question left, but Williams ties everything up rather nicely. It never felt like Miss Fury was crazy instead of actually traveling time, so that they continue to play that possibility does read as odd. Herbert’s art is spectacular. He pulls out all the stops to end things with a bang. There is one panel in particular that looks and feels like it’s actually 3D. On top of that, he does an excellent job at portraying the shock, surprise, and entire gambit of emotions on the characters’ faces. Nunes’ colors elevate the entire story. He does a spectacular job of selling the action and making the warships and other electronics pop off the page.

Bottom Line: Williams started out with a slightly confusing, but entertaining story hopping back and forth through time and closes it out by flipping over all of his cards and explaining how things played out. It’s very much like Doctor Who in a sense. You don’t understand it completely when you’re going through it, but stick around because the answers will come. An intriguing story with fantastic art will make you want to check out the next arc for sure. 3.5/5

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