Review: Miss Fury #1

by
Review of: Miss Fury #1
Product by:
Rob Williams & Jack Herbert
Version:
Dynamite
Price:
$3.99

Reviewed by:
Rating:
3
On April 3, 2013
Last modified:April 3, 2013

Summary:

There are more questions than answers, but there’s enough here to entice you to come back. With an interesting story and great art, Miss Fury is one older readers need to keep an eye on.

THE PULP HEROINE RETURNS! When Miss Fury foils a wartime plot by Nazi secret agents, she is catapulted through time… or so it seems. Is she really careening from past to future and back, or has she lost her mind? And if her sanity remains intact, can one lone heroine possibly hope to end World War II by herself, a conflict still waged into the year 2013? As witness to generations of bloodshed and violence, Miss Fury has lots of righteous rage… and anger is her fearsome power!

Dynamite gives Miss Furyfury cover her own book this week with the release of Black Fury #1. The super heroine from the 1940s gets a revamped origin by way of writer Rob Williams and illustrator Jack Herbert. Ivan Nunes handles colors with Simon Bowland handling letters. Miss Fury is a pulp hero with no powers, but does her new book at least pack a punch?

Our story opens on the rooftop where Miss Fury is thwarting the plans of a group of Nazi agents in the US. One man is left, and he’s strangely phasing in and out talking about time. An agent from the O.S.S. arrives on the scene to lend Miss Fury, one of those new costumed superheroes, a hand. Only she doesn’t want help and she isn’t a superhero. She was just trying to steal some valuables from the museum. This leads to our first time shift as we go back prior to this event where we start to learn about Miss Fury and her alter ego Marla Drake. Drake lays out her origin story and how she came by her persona deep in the heart of the Dark Continent. Her father died leaving her a vast fortune, but you can only imagine how boring that makes things. As we learn more about our heroine, we get yet another time shift where she is propelled into a grim future where World War II is still being fought in 2013. Has she been flung into the future, or is Miss Fury losing her mind?

Williams crafts an interesting origin story. Things move along smoothly on those parts, but the time jump elements add another element that makes things a little confusing. Granted it is only the first issue, but you feel like you’re missing something. It does have the benefit of making you want to come back next time though. Williams has crafted an adult book for sure. With salty language and adult situations, this is one for mature readers. Herbert does a great job on art. He crafts both the stunning Ms. Drake as well as her alter ego Miss Fury, complete with her teeth gnashing action scenes. Nunes’s colors are vibrant and really make everything pop.

Bottom Line: Williams crafts a fresh, yet mature, origin story for Miss Fury. There are more questions than answers, but there’s enough here to entice you to come back. With an interesting story and great art, Miss Fury is one older readers need to keep an eye on 3.5/5

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