Review: Jupiter’s Legacy #2

by
Review of: Jupiter’s Legacy #2
Product by:
Mark Millar
Version:
IMAGE
Price:
$2.99

Jupiter's Legacy #2


Reviewed by:
Rating:
3
On June 26, 2013
Last modified:June 26, 2013

Summary:

Jupiter’s Legacy #1 blow the doors off, but #2 takes it down several notches. It’s still a solid and enjoyable story, it just feels more like a soap opera than exploration of the big ideas presented in the debut issue.

The comic book event of 2013 continues as the schism between the superheroes widens and a plot to unseat the greatest hero of them all emerges. Celebrate the 75th anniversary of Superman this month by buying this frankly much-more interesting book by superstar creators MARK MILLAR and FRANK QUITELY.

The second issue of Jupiter’s Legacy, Image comics’ collaboration with Mark Millar, hits stores today. The story is written by Millar with art by Frank Quitely. Peter Doherty provides colors and letters with Rob Miller serving as the digital assistant. The first issue really hits hard. Does the second entry astound just as much as the debut?

The issue opens with Brandon and his super powered friends levitating a giant freight ship over land to “help” the crew shave off a few hours of their travel time and thus prove that the messed up kids of the original heroes are heroes themselves. Brandon’s father, Utopian, quickly arrives on the scene to save the ship from these young “heroes.” Like any father would do when their kid acts out, Utopian chews out Brandon in front of all of his friends. Brandon and the old man have it out as the clash between the golden age heroes and the more modern powered children gets literal. Chloe, Brandon’s sister, is in the hospital recovering from her super drug overdose. She learns that part of the problem is she’s pregnant. This revelation sets off a few pages of baby daddy drama as she tries to come to terms with what’s going on. The final thread of the story for this issue deals with Walter, Utopian’s brother, leading an economic think tank in the White House. Utopian specifically told him they must stay out of politics, but Walter feels his superior mind is just what the country needs. The divide between Walter and Utopian widens and Walter finds himself plotting against his brother. Who from the new era of heroes can he recruit to lead the charge? Will he keep it in the family?

Millar settles in to what the main story is going to be about with Jupiter’s Legacy, but it’s a bit of a downgrade from the near perfect first issue. It seems to be a story about the old and the new clashing, sons/daughters and their desire to live up to their parents’ standards, the troubling times we’re living in now, and about betrayal. This issue borders more on soap opera in capes. You have Chloe pregnant by a man she can’t be with and the trouble that brings her. When Walter is talking to Utopian about taking a more hands-on approach with the government, they talk economics for three pages. There are literally three pages devoted to Walter arguing economics with Utopian. Frank Quitely absolutely delivers though. I’ve seldom see him do anything less than spectacular and this issue is no different.

Bottom Line: Jupiter’s Legacy #1 blow the doors off, but #2 takes it down several notches. It’s still a solid and enjoyable story, it just feels more like a soap opera than exploration of the big ideas presented in the debut issue. Quitely brings his “A” game though. This might be the issue where we settle in for what’s coming, so don’t count Jupiter’s Legacy out just yet. 3/5

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