Review: Breath Of Bones: A Tale Of The Golem #2

by

After rescuing an injured British pilot, the town must protect themselves and their secret from the Nazi occupiers. Using clay and mud from the river, they bring to life a giant monster to destroy those who would harm them.

golem coverThe penultimate issue of Breath of Bones: A Tale of the Golem is released today. The three issue series with a story by Steve Niles and Matt Santoro tells the tale of a young Jewish boy in WWI and the lessons his grandfather teaches him about power and being a good man. There’s also a giant golem who will soon fight Nazis. The script is by Steve Niles with art by Dave Wachter. Nate Piekos of Blambot provides lettering. The first issue was absolutely astounding. Does the second issue live up to its predecessor?

The story opens the morning after the first issue. Jacob, the grandfather, is holding a meeting with the townspeople. They know the Nazis are coming and they have to decide what they will do, not only with themselves but the injured British pilot they are hiding. It’s a tense meeting and not everyone agrees with Jacob’s plan. There isn’t much time to argue because two Nazis on a motorcycle are coming to investigate the plan crash. Since there’s still one issue left, you can guess that things don’t go well and what’s supposed to be hidden doesn’t stay hidden. With no time left and an even larger number of Nazi troops fast approaching, the townspeople decide to flee the village. Jacob asks them to help him build one last thing before they leave. Noah and his grandmother are the only two that fully trust Jacob. They stay behind to help him finish his new project. With a whole slew of Nazis approaching the city, time has run out. Can Jacob and Noah finish building their last hope of survival in time? Will the Nazis find a surprise guarding the city?

Niles writes another spectacular issue. This story moves a lot faster than the previous one. That’s not to say it’s a lite story or a fluff piece, it’s just a tense story that has you turning the pages to see what happens next. Where the first issue was all heart, this one is more action. Everything has been set up and now the pieces are put together. The only thing left is to see how it all ends. Wachter’s art is brilliant. He again brings heavy emotion to the story and completely sells the bond between Noah and his grandfather. He also gets a few action scenes to flex a few different muscles in this particular story.

Bottom Line: Breath of Bones: A Tale of the Golem isn’t an action story as it’s billed to be, it’s an emotional story that just happens to have some action. That’s not a bad thing. The two issues prove it’s actually a great thing. Things can end in three issues, but with each page you wish there was more. 5/5

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