J.H. Williams III Opens Up About His Public Departure From BATWOMAN

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batwomanJ.H. Williams III and W. Haden Blackman had a very public departure from the fan-favorite Batwoman title a few months ago. Things played out over the course of a few weeks online, getting rather nasty at times. Williams and Blackman handled themselves very professionally and even tried to calm down the outrage that set segments of the internet ablaze. Other than a handful of Tweets and a blog post composed by both men, Williams hasn’t talked about the departure or his time on Batwoman publicly. In a recent interview with Newsarama about his stunning work on the already critically acclaimed Sandman: Overture, Williams did have a few things to say about the recent departure.

batwomanAfter sharing some great insights into his work on Sandman, his desire to do more high art, and how he’s currently batting around some creator-owned comic ideas, Williams was asked about the touchy subject of the red-headed caped crusader. When asked if he’s been able to move on in the two months since the departure:

It still sort of lingers, but I’m not fuming over stuff. I have to be able to set it aside on an emotional level, but I don’t think about it too much. Getting into conversations about it, and discussing my decision to leave and how it ended up being blown out of proportion, it sometimes stings. Batwoman was a project I deeply cared about, and it showed. Parts of it will always stick with me in a way, but I don’t want to be wallowing over it. However, it was an important enough event, and the circumstances of how it ended and some of the fallout are going to stick with me for a while. But I’m glad a project like that can affect me in that way; it means I was working on something I felt had value… personal value, and value to others. It would be a sad affair if after two months – or even six months, or any measure of time – that I didn’t care about how events transpired, and I think that would say bad things about me as a creative individual. That’s not the case, and I’m glad that whenever I think about it has some emotional resonance.

Even though it still ‘stings‘ at times, Williams is still able to see his time on Batwoman as a positive experience in a lot of ways. When asked how he would summarize the experience, Williams can see a little good in things:

I think it’s changed me in a very positive way even though unfortunately Batwoman ended on a sour note for Haden and I. It was a positive experience overall, and I don’t think we would have said no in doing it initially even if we knew it might not have ended well. It was a worthwhile journey to take, regardless of what the final outcome became.
One thing though, it made me tired because of the schedule. [laughs] It was pretty daunting, but it was an entertaining and learning experience. Doing what I did flexed different creative muscles, as I was writing scripts and thinking of plot directions; figuring out what the characters were thinking. It was a great learning experience, and one that I hope to continue through other projects in the future. I’ve always kind of felt like I was a storyteller and not just an artist, but working on Batwoman for such an extended time showed me that to be a storyteller you need to be telling stories, and that’s what I hope to do more in the future.

Williams says that it’s hard to try and offer any advice for fellow creators since each experience depends on the individual, but he suggests that creators stick to their guns if they feel strongly about something and to “not make choices out of fear of what might happen to their career.” That philosophy has done well for him so far. He’s on one of the most high-profile books out there with Sandman and his future is looking even brighter. You can read the full interview by clicking the source link below to see a lot more from Williams. What do you think about the artist’s comments?

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Source : Newsarama