Drew Pearce Talks A Little More About The RUNAWAYS And How It Was GODFATHER-Like

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runawaysIron Man 3 co-writer Drew Pearce has been out and about talking about the new Marvel one-shot All Hail the King. Pearce wrote and directed the 14-minute short starring Sir Ben Kingsley, so he’s been promoting that and discussing how it came about. He has also been getting a lot of questions about his Runaways script and what he thinks the chances are that Marvel will actually get around to making it a movie. The film based on the children of super villains who runaway and become heroes was on track to becoming one of the first team movies, but then The Avengers happened. Earth’s Mightiest Heroes have shaped the face of the Marvel Cinematic Universe since their first film, but the Runaways‘ script is still tucked away in the Marvel vaults just in case it’s needed. Speaking with Collider earlier today, Pearce opened up a little more about his script and the tone of his adaptation of Brian K. Vaughn‘s characters.

Pearce was asked how the job of writing the script even came about in the first place. It turns out the writer and now director is a gigantic fan of the series and put it at the top of his list when Marvel asked what he might like to do. The fact that the company loved his TV show No Heroics helped him get get the writing gig for the project in his #1 spot:

I adore the comics, and the first thing I ever talked to Marvel about. In my first general meeting with Marvel, they were like, “We love No Heroics! If there was anything you’d like to do at Marvel, what would it be?” and Runaways was at the top of my list. I think Brian [K. Vaughan] is—often a misused word—a genius. Saga currently shows that as well as anything else.
So yeah, I had used the first arc as my template. It’s a hugely cinematic arc. I can’t really comment on how I used the twist, but I think thus far you can see from some of the stuff I’ve done I do quite like a twist. You can definitely presume that some of the zig-zagging that goes on in Runaways the comic made it into the movie.

runaways-pride-and-joyThe writer is staying tight-lipped about the actual plot of the movie just in case it ever gets made, but he has been teasing the scope and tone of the movie. He states that it could even be Marvel‘s version of The Godfather. Pearce isn’t claiming his movie is a guaranteed cinematic masterpiece like The Godfather, he’s just saying they are similar in terms of exploring family, crime, and how the two interact:

But I think the big difference being that—as grandiose as it sounds—cinematically I wanted it to reflect (and this is going to sound ridiculous), but for me, Runaways can be The Godfather of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. And The Pride in my version were an even more branded crime syndicate. I think if you then look at the arcs and character twists you were talking about, and that lineage, it’s in a very analogous way.

Pearce goes on to talk a little more about the film and how Joss Whedon‘s run on the title could have made for a good third movie. You can read the rest of the writer’s comments by clicking the source link below. You can tell that he’s still very excited about the Runaways and is passionate about it actually getting made. Marvel is starting to introduce new characters and teams, so there’s still a chance it could get the green light in the future. Phase 3 is almost booked up, so Phase 4 would be the earliest possible time for the young band of super powered heroes to get their shot at the big time. What do you think about Pearce‘s comments? Are you, like Pearce, still holding out hope that we will see the Runaways on the silver screen?

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Source : Collider