Doctor Strange Shows Off His New Powers In NEW AVENGERS ANNUAL #1

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s1New Avengers has seen writer Jonathan Hickman making some serious and weighty stuff happen in the Marvel Universe. The incursion events have caused rogue planets to come in contact with one another, with the end result being one ends or they both do. The Illuminati have been handling these incursions, but they’re starting to face off against worlds that are harder to deal with than others. To help win the fight, and after several setbacks caused some massive frustration, Doctor Strange traveled to a dark place and voluntarily exchanged his soul for the power of a god. What happens next remains to be seen, but it will be explored in part with New Avengers Annual #1 from writer Frank J. Barbiere with painted art by Marco Rudy. The writer recently spoke to CBR about the annual and how Doctor Strange will be exploring his new found power.

Barbiere says that the annual will take place directly after Strange sells his soul in New Avengers #14. Strange will be adjusting to his new, unimaginable power levels and really cutting loose on the astral plane. The writer explained what aspects of Strange‘s character he wanted to explore in his over-sized story:

I think Strange is in a really interesting place in “New Avengers.” During “Infinity” he was possessed by the Ebony Maw and that really shook him up. It showed that there were holes in his power, which led to his possession. I feel like that echoes a lot of the nature of Strange. He’s a character with extreme hubris.
He’s the Sorcerer Supreme. He thinks he’s the best at what he’s doing, and that mirrors a lot of what he was doing when he was a neurosurgeon. He thought he was a great doctor, and that led to him becoming Doctor Strange. He went and studied as a way to get his power back, and now that he is powered up from selling his soul we throw him head first into a situation with another impossible solution. I want it to echo what’s going on in “New Avengers” where they’re faced with this impossible problem and it really just explores the idea of how would these characters who should be objectively good handle a situation where they need to do something in a kind of gray area?

Part of that will see a more determined Strange. Barbiere says the Sorcerer Supreme has something to prove now. The good doctor is saying “I haven’t really been at my best lately, but now I’m ready to take things beyond the next level.” This new threat will help him test his new resolve. The writer explains what sets the story in motion:

Strange has always been one of those characters who has a network of contacts within the arcane community and I really wanted to get him away from the main conflict in “New Avengers” for this. I wanted to do something that only Strange was suited to do. The solicits mention that he’s called upon by an enclave of techno monks. So it’s a fun way to have him go to a monastery, but it’s not a normal monastery because we’ve seen him in that type of setting before.

We establish that Strange encountered the monks back when he was first searching for his power, but they’ve evolved since then as well. They’re actually cybernetic and into new technologies. They’ve called on Strange because something has gone very wrong with what they’re researching. That leads us into a problem that falls into a gray area and doesn’t have an analog good or bad solution. They’ve called on Strange because they know he’s the Sorcerer Supreme and can navigate the Astral Plane much better than they can.

These techno monks will be messing in similar territory as A.I.M., mining other realities and pulling something deadly out. This strange being leads to some rather far-out battles on the astral plane with Doctor Strange using some more aggressive magic than we’re used to seeing him use. You can read the rest of what Barbiere had to say at the source link, but you can check out some of Rudy‘s stunning water colored artwork below. This new chapter in the life of Doctor Strange kicks off this June. What do you think?

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Source : CBR