Bryan Singer And James McAvoy Talk X3, First Class, And Days Of Future Past

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x3I don’t know if Bryan Singer and some of the X-Men are going to have anything to talk about when Days of Future Past actually comes out. We’ve heard a lot about how Singer is going to set up the movie and we’ve even been treated to casting announcements via his Twitter. Now we’ve got a few more new quotes from Singer and James McAvoy about what they have in store.

bryan_singer1Bleeding Cool ran the rest of their X-related questions with director Bryan Singer when they spoke with him about Jack the Giant Slayer premiering in the UK. Singer talked about X3 being directed by Brett Ratner and how that was weird for him to see. Singer checked out a rough cut of the film when someone who wasn’t supposed to show it to him let him watch it, just so he wouldn’t be “freaked out” when he saw it in the theater. He did eventually see it in the theater and much like everyone else, there were things he didn’t like about it:

There are parts of X-Men 3… it isn’t what I would have done, but parts of it, I liked. Ellen Page was something I liked in X-Men 3 and I’m bringing her to Days of Future Past. Certain things are different. There was a lot going on in it and I wasn’t so happy with so many people dying, but then there were some really sweet moments with that kid, the cure kid.

I just rewatched all the movies the other day. We had a big screening of every X-Men movie just to remind myself what they are. I don’t go to see my movies.

I said I’ll “fix a few things” [with Days of Future Past]. It won’t be its primary function but there will be some fixing. It’s a really cool story, and incidentally, it facilitates all of these characters. They weren’t just thrown in there. And they all play a fun role.

I want there to be some humour and some fun. In Days of Future Past there are some genuinely things in it. I can’t wait, and I know they will be fun to shoot. I want to keep that humour [because] the thing about X-Men is that the themes are serious, but the film doesn’t need to be…

 

xavierOn the other side of the spectrum, First Class’ Professor X (James McAvoy) talked with the site in a different interview about what he was trying to do with Charles’ story arc. He wanted to do something a little different and really show the change he goes through when he becomes paralyzed:

In X-Men: First Class I tried to get this thing across which they didn’t really run with. I had the idea that Charles Xavier was a bit conceited. But that is his privileged nature, even though he has a natural empathy. His whole power basically is a physical manifestation of empathy but [my idea was that] it still hadn’t come to full fruition yet because he didn’t really understand pain. By the end of the movie, he gets his pain and he truly becomes Professor X, learns empathy, because he understands what life is like for everybody else.

He’s so unlike most mutants. Every mutant’s story is about living in the ghetto and being fucked up, being bullied and all that. But Professor X is like, “Yeah, I have had a fucking excellent life to be honest with you… I don’t know what you are fucking complaining about” But then he gets his pain… and that’s what will propel him into the next movie to go through the crucible, to grow into that power of empathy he’s more traditionally portrayed with.

You can follow the links to read a little more from each man about X-Men and other films they’re working on. Singer has talked about his problems with X3 before, but that’s one of the first times he’s talked about what he’d use from it to work with Days of Future Past. McAvoy certainly has a different take on ol’ Charles as well. It will be interesting to see if he sneaks any of those ideas into the next film. We know he’s in the chair now, but hopefully he’s also sporting the cue ball look.  What do you think of the two guy’s comments? Anything in particular you’d like Singer to “fix”?

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