Bryan Hitch Talks Leaving Marvel And Scrapped Projects With Joss Whedon

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bryan hitchIn a pretty extensive interview with Comic Book Resources, The Ultimates Co-creator and superstar artist Bryan Hitch talked about leaving Marvel for more creator-owned type projects. During his answers it seemed Hitch may have been frustrated with the way things were going for him during his final years at Marvel. While he stated in the article and earlier today on his Twitter account that he didn’t want his comments  to sound anything other than “light, frothy and pleasant” and the ten years at Marvel were a high point in his career, it did at least seem he was less than pleased with some things. Read his comments and a reply from Editor Tom Brevoort to see what you think.

Hitch has stated numerous times that he had finished Ultron War, which will finally be released next summer, in 2011. He talked about the creative process and how he kept going because of a six-part Ultimate Captain America series he had been working on:

Yes, “Ultron” was very different from “Ultimates” in may respects both in the nature of my collaboration with Bendis as opposed to Mark [Millar] and in the whole feel of the project. Two ends of a long rope really.

It wasn’t intended to be my “swan song” either, really. My then current contract expired at the end of 2011 and whilst drawing “Ultron,” I’d also been writing a six-part “Ultimate Captain America” series I’d started drawing. It was fully written, and I was drawing the first issue in the gaps between Ultron scripts coming in. “Ultron” sort of kept expanding, and I was never wholly sure of what the full scope was as I was never involved in any planning or plotting for it. We knew I had time for about five issues before my deal expired, and I was happy to extend a short while to complete the series if it ran to six or maybe seven issues, as seemed possible. It was politely indicated to me that it wouldn’t be necessary and thank you for the work, and so, as planned, off I went to the heady world of creator owned and “AGP.”

capHitch went on to say he didn’t even know it was a ten-issue series until he saw the announcement on the web like everybody else. Hitch talked about the failed Cap series and gives the comments many see as him voicing his frustration:

Despite Marvel coming to me and asking for the Cap series, rather than my pitching it to them, it was constantly being sidelined and eventually dropped to my disappointment. Since “Ultimates” ended, I’d been less and less involved in a collaborative process at Marvel. They now had their various brains-trusts, architects or whatever the gang was calling themselves, and that was what led their creative process. It seemed a very closed shop and not what it was like when I signed up to do “Ultimates” at all. I felt like they wanted an illustrator not a creator, and that was very frustrating to me. I’d submitted several proposals for various series, getting nowhere; Cap was dropped, and I didn’t even feel involved in the story I was working on. It really felt like I wasn’t contributing the way I wanted to be.

The artist states that he guessed “there’s a time when you feel like you don’t know anybody at the party anymore or nobody’s laughing at your jokes and it’s time to call a cab.” Even more interesting, he says that had he know the Ultron series was longer than five issues and the Cap series would have made it to print he may have never considered moving on. After comparing how the creative process worked with Brian Bendis compared to Mark Miller (which is VERY interesting), Hitch dropped something that may devastate many fans. He mentioned that Marvel and editor Joey Q passed on a Spider-Man series that would have been written by Joss Whedon.

I highly recommend that you read the entire interview with CBR, which you can do by clicking here, to see what all Hitch had to say. I leave you with Editor Tom Brevoort’s comments on his Formspring account when asked about the CBR interview with Hitch.

brevoort

 

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Source : CBR