25 Days of Christmas Therapy: “A Christmas Carol”

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For the final installment of of 25 Days, we bring you the Charles Dickens‘ masterpiece, “A Christmas Carol. For those of you not familiar with the story, it’s about a character named Ebenezer Scrooge and his transformation. Scrooge doesnt’ care much for Christmas or anything/anyone else for that matter. One Christmas Eve night he’s visited by the ghost of his former business parter, Jacob Marley. Marley tells Scrooge that be needs to change his ways or else the rest of his life will reflect on this bitterness and that he will be visited by three spirits, the ghost of Christmas past, the ghost of Christmas present, and the ghost of Christmas yet to come.  Through these journeys that Scrooge takes with each spirit, he sees an outside looks on his life and realizes that he needs to change things.

The reason we chose “A Christmas Carol” for the last 25 Days is that this is quite possibly the most well known tale of Christmas. The 19th century novel has spawned countless film adaptations, live performances, and animated parodies and features. My personal favorite is the George C. Scott version from 1984. Just like Moore’s “A Visit From St. Nick”, “A Christmas Carol” is important to the era because it promoted the idea of family and selflessness. The people of the victorian era connected with this story and its characters and started to adopt the ideals some of the characters held in this book.

I think this book is a timeless masterpiece. I always try to make time to read it ever December. It never gets old. And, if you feel like it’s getting old, there are tons of other versions that have their own spin on the story.

From myself and everyone here at Comic Book Therapy, thanks for reading 25 Days of Christmas Therapy and Merry Christmas!

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